Our Female Pileated Woodpecker, Central Missouri

by Lisa
(central Missouri, USA)




We were thrilled to see a female Pileated Woodpecker land on our cake suet feeder a few months ago here in central Missouri, and since, she's become a regular daily visitor.


She typically comes to visit 3-4 times a day, eagerly feeding on our suet cake feeder, as well as our suet peanut butter nuggets. She loves both.

I am curious to know of what time of year she will typically nest and if Pileateds bring their young to feeders with them. We would be so thrilled to see her young ones, although so far, we've not seen a male.

She is a gorgeous bird, and we're so honored to have her daily company.

Comments for Our Female Pileated Woodpecker, Central Missouri

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Feb 26, 2013
Thank you Tom NEW
by: Susan

Thanks Tom. Lucky you to have them at your feeders every year. Have yet to have one visit me.

Feb 19, 2013
pileated fledglings
by: Anonymous

We have a number of pileateds that eat at our suet and we have at least one fledgling every year. The parents usually feed it at first until it can figure out how to use the feeder.

Tom - Western WA

Feb 18, 2013
Nesting Habits
by: Susan

Pileated Woodpeckers usually nest in the same tree every year, in the late spring. I would be surprised to see the babies at your suet feeder. Parents usually take food to their babies in the nest. Thank you for the photos!

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