Tufted Titmouse

Tufted Titmouse

Tufted Titmouse Baeolophus bicolor

Description:

  • Size: 6 inches (14-16 cm)
  • Wingspan: 8 to 10 inches (20-26 cm)
  • Weight: .64 to .92 ounces (18-26 g)

This is a small grey bird with a short tuft on its head. It has prominent black eyes on a pale grey face.

Diet:

This cute little song bird eats insects, seeds and berries. Can be attracted to bird feeders with black oil sunflower seeds and suet bird food.

Sex Differences:

The male and female have the same color and markings.

Nesting:

They will construct their nests in natural tree cavities and bird houses. Uses moss, hair, grass, leaves, cotton and bark to construct its nest.

Range:

Tufted Titmouse Range Map
Tufted Titmouse Range Map Key

A Few Things You Probably Didn't Know:

  • Since the 1940's, their range has grown from south to north, due in part to the increased number of bird feeders.
  • Will use its sharp, black bill to open moth cocoons, shells of other insect larvae and eggs for feeding.
  • As part of courtship, the male will feed the female while she quivers her wings and sings with high-pitched notes.

More information on how to attract a Tufted Titmouse and other wild birds into your yard. 

Information on other backyard birds


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